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On Audre Lorde’s Legacy and the “Self” of Self-Care, Part 1 of 3

lowendtheory:

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[Please do not be that ass who reblogs this image and deletes the text below.]

Update: Part Two here.

We’re still learning to read Audre Lorde, who should have been 79 today. We’re still learning to become the collectivity, the “we,” that would make reading Audre Lorde possible. The Audre Lorde that I think is especially worth reading is not the Audre Lorde that reads like a bumper sticker.  Nor is it the Audre Lorde that settles the score, once and for all, the Audre Lorde who puts the full stop on the conversations we’ve needed to have before we’ve had them.  The Audre Lorde I’m interested in is perhaps too queer to set things straight for us politically.  Which also means that it’s also not the Audre Lorde who exists as an alibi.  The Audre Lorde that’s most interesting to me is the Audre Lorde who is a complex, often contradictory historical figure, a figure whose brilliance resides not in her individual insight but in her capacity to creatively animate and inhabit the very contradictions in which she lived.  It is that kind of brilliance that makes her A. Lorde and not, well, a Lord; that is, not a god-like figure whose authority is to be deferred to once and for all, but someone whose life and work provide an rich world of problems, questions, and ideas worth thinking with, borrowing from, confronting, and, of course, disagreeing with.  I’m interested in claiming Audre Lorde as a human. Which is to say that in many ways, she was not, ultimately, that much unlike you or me.  Even in her radical difference.  Even because of it.

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versesandflow:

The Denver, Colorado duo Free Verse gave a compelling and thought provoking performance of their spoken word piece “Amandla” on this week’s episode of Verses and Flow. Before setting foot on the stage, they took us on their journey. Take a look…… then tell us your journey.

TRUTH.

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slamnahuatl:

One of our friends from the lovely UNC team was featured on Buzzfeed’s “8 Pieces of LGBT Spoken Word Poetry That Will Leave You Speechless" for his ~fabulous~ poem "God is Gay" from CUPSI 2013. Go check it out!

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dripping-adorableness:

vice-city-public-relations-guy:

sugashane:

eltigrechico:

goldengrime:

triplegoddesss:

Kanye West on Jimmy Kimmel Live!

i can’t believe they called this a rant. Kanye West just put my evolution as person in words. i’ve been saying this for years.

in all honestly as much as I like to dump on Kanye I’ll admit that reading this it makes a lot more sense than it sounded on TV.

I’m telling y’all, Kanye is a genius. He knows exactly what he’s doing. 

He’s actually pretty remarkable. He has suffered from acute depression in the past. His story could potentially save lives. 

^^^

(Source: michaelcorleone, via arianathepoet)

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Last night I danced like a fool with some of my favorite poets in the wuuurld. DJ was going in last night after louderARTS open mic. #nyc #poetry #wutang #biggie

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"The soul that is within me no man can degrade." -Fred Douglass. #ancestors #nyc #love #power

"The soul that is within me no man can degrade." -Fred Douglass. #ancestors #nyc #love #power

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"

My body
writes into your flesh
the poem
you make of me.

Touching you
I catch midnight
as moon fires
set
in my throat.

"

— Audre Lorde, from Recreation (via violentwavesofemotion)

(via sistereskista)

Tags: Audre Lorde
Quote
"I really believe that applying poetry, or language in general, to trauma is the ultimate act of reclaiming. Naming something gives you a sort of ownership over it (hey, colonialism did it all the time, haha), so choosing words that identify your experience makes it less of this looming unknown that has you at its mercy. It makes everything less ‘something that happened to me’ and more ‘experience/story that belongs to me,’ you know?"

— Safia Elhillo, interviewed for The Body Narratives (via bostonpoetryslam)

(via oddballsdontbounce)

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NaPoWriMo 8: i can tell

i can tell my story
better than yours.
i can tell your story
easier than mine.
i can tell the story
with pen or mouth.
i can tell the story
with arms & eyes.

i can tell you things
you did not know.
i can tell you things
you already know
because you forgot.
i can tell you “you can”
but, until you believe it,
i can tell… you cannot.

© Rob Gibsun

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NaPoWriMo 7: at the nile open mic

april fools sign up
until the list runneth over
a congregation chants oooo i feel so good

the goddess of truth
arrives on a ship made of song.
an ocean of hearts gurgle on the shoreline.

a blaque girl sings i’m gone
as a manic ambulance shrieks by
red lights reiterate this could’ve been you.

a poet in the front row is losing
his papa to a hungry ghost. the goddess
whispers switch the setlist; read that poem.

words ripples thru the room
tears anchor a son’s brown face,
hearts swell & mythically the nile floods again.

a black boy sings baby, i’m broke
the audience earthquakes into laughter
humor’s mouth landslides over all our tragedy

time resurfaces from its riverbed
the community weaves its voice into life vest
art pulls the ripcord & the goddess sails back home.

© Rob Gibsun